Hollywood Preaches

“I have always felt life first as a story – and if there is a story, there is a story teller.” G.K. Chesterton

Life doesn’t come to us as a math problem. It comes to us the way that a story comes, scene by scene. What will happen next?  You and I don’t get to know those specifics of our lives; we just enter in and take the journey as it comes.  We humans have lingering questions.  Who am I really?  Why am I here?  Where do I find the meaning of my life?  What does God want of me?  Sometimes it feels like a movie that we’ve arrived at 45 minutes late.  Interesting stuff, but I don’t get it!  To know the answers, we must engage with the story teller, we must see the bigger picture.

Science does not provide the answers we need. Far too many scientists (not all to be sure) say the answer to the question “How did it all begin?” is “An accident.”  To the question “How will it all end?” they repeat themselves, “Probably by another accident.”  And we sigh, thinking that doesn’t feel like a life worth living; knowing there must be a better answer than that.

Then we go to the movies and watch what on the surface appears to be a secular story, but it is interesting how it plays out. “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.”    In all such stories, we see a similar theme.  There is love, adventure, danger, a hero, an evil adversary, sacrifice is required, odds that seem insurmountable, and yet in the end the hero is victorious!  Ever notice how such themes are common in movies, yet depict a scenario so similar to the picture the Bible paints?  Wonder why that is?

Hollywood Preaches

The Sound of Music, Braveheart, Gladiator, Rocky, The Matrix, The Lord of the Rings, Spiderman, etc. On and on we could go with movies that tell the Bible story, they just don’t use the Bible characters.  A positive scene with peace, then something goes wrong, there is an evil person who wants to hurt the protagonists, things seem desperate, a battle is fought, and the hero must overcome many obstacles to win the day and restore peace.  Isn’t that the Bible story?  Hollywood preaches this over and over without even realizing the parallel.  All such stories have the same basic structure because these stories borrow from the Larger Story of life. Use this as a teaching tool with your kids as you watch movies.

Maybe we can learn from Hollywood how to better position ourselves for life’s story. Not religion as usual, just going to church on Sunday with proper manners. Religion is often man’s attempt to find God, but with Christianity we find God’s attempt to find man (you and me) through Christ.  That relationship and what it means defines our part in the story. Do we side with the evil one, or with the hero?  To wade into the muddy water in-between puts us in danger.  But we play a part in this story, to be sure. “Going to church” is a piece of it, we sure aren’t super heroes, so we need encouragement and resources.

And we finally realize that the only person who can properly define this story is the author himself. Wouldn’t it be something if he wrote it all down for us to read, to study, to learn from and work from?  “I wonder what sort of tale we’ve fallen into?” says Sam to Frodo in Lord of the Rings.  I wonder.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…the Word became flesh and dwelt among us.” (John 1) A hero has arrived; read of him and learn the true story.

Advertisements

Church – Why Bother?

Church-Why Bother

I grew up going to church. Mom was a dedicated Christian, but Dad was not in the early years. He would drop Mom, my sister, and myself off on Sunday morning at the side door of 1st Christian Church in Vandalia, MO. I’d attend a Sunday school class, then I’d attend worship and set with mom, my sister Sandy, and mom’s parents (my grandparents). This continued for all of my growing up years. Eventually my Dad became a Christian and was there with us. Over the 13 years until I went to college this was part of almost every week. I was part of the youth group as a teenager, part of the Christmas plays, even sang in a quartet a few times (I know this part of the story is hard to believe). Then I went to college and strayed for a few years, but as Proverbs 22:6 says, “Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he’s old he will not depart from it.” There was danger in my straying, but I came back and with some bumpy roads since then have continued as a man of faith in Christ ever since.

Why do I say all this? To illustrate that church matters. The primary teacher of children growing up should be their parents, but even when this happens effectively it is very important to have a social element that reinforces such teaching and provides encouragement, connections and resources that help the individual stay the course. I’m here to tell you: church matters! We live in a day when you don’t hear that message much. Many ask: Why bother with church? They just prefer to “believe” and go their individual way.

People are busy. The kids have school activities, mom and dad both work, there’s always something, and Sunday is the one opportunity to sleep late and relax (unless there’s a school or sport activity on Sunday, even Sundays are busy now days). Then there’s the typical church services. They don’t appeal to many men who are action oriented, who love to be outside, who work hard and don’t particularly enjoy group singing and sitting through an hour of religious stuff. It becomes easy when the culture disregards such things to disregard them ourselves.

And then there’s those people. You know, those Christians. They can be an odd sort, with personalities that are as varied as the general population, some are mature, some not so much, some have unusual perspectives, some are very loving, some very strict, some are hypocrites who proclaim values they do not live up to. All of that and more. It can become very easy to be frustrated with such people who don’t always live up to the standards that even you believe should be “Christian.” I recall the old rhyme: To dwell in love with the saints above, well that will be glory; but to dwell below with the saints I know, well that’s a different story. But then there’s you….

You struggle with sin (things God in the Bible state are wrong), just like everyone else. The people criticized in the church are really a lot like the critic. A lot like you. For all of us there’s a process we must go through to take an infant faith and allow it to mature. So yes, there are plenty of those who wear the name Christian who can be criticized. Some aren’t really Christian at all; they just wear the name. Others are sincere, they just need to get further into the maturation process, growing more like their Savior. But it takes a process, for them and for you.

And that brings us back to the church. The “gathering of Christians” (what the word church means) is for that very purpose. We gather to encourage each other, to study God’s Word together to learn the path he wants us on, to remember what Jesus Christ has done for us through his death and resurrection (in the Lord’s Supper). We pray, we sing, we give to the gospel cause. We attend a class or small group and get to know others on the same path. Kids grow up having what their parents teach them at home reinforced in a social environment. It’s not always a pretty path, but in this sinful messed up world, it’s the best path of all! Can’t we recognize the value of church?

“Let us consider how to stir one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together.”  – Hebrews 10:24, 25

To the Closed Heart

I am not better than you, whoever you are. And I’m not the nut “Christian” that you saw on the news doing something political or strange. I am not your judge. I do not have all the answers. But I do have a few questions that I’d like you to consider:

What do you believe? You’ve closed your heart to Christian faith, I’m not sure why, but surely you believe in something. Is it really God you have rejected, or just an inaccurate portrayal of him? If we are honest, even though we don’t think about it much, we know that we face death one day. On what basis do you have hope beyond the grave? If you take the time to really read the Bible, about how God revealed himself in Jesus Christ, how through Jesus he died for our sins, and how through the resurrection of Jesus we can have hope for resurrection one day, that’s a pretty amazing thing. Is that what you’ve rejected? Take a closer look, please.

Are you an atheist? That would seem odd to me. Most people don’t define themselves by what they do not believe. I don’t call myself an “a-Buddhist” or an “a-Muslim” (“a” in front of the word means you are not what follows). Yet some call themselves a-theists. They do not believe in God, and that’s how they define themselves. But I don’t know you: how do you define yourself?

In spite of a huge amount of evidence to support creation and the Bible and the historical person of Jesus and his resurrection, there are tough questions that arise; but tell me, must all of your questions be answered before you believe? In the realm of science, for example, there are many unanswered questions, many mistakes they make, do you fail to believe in science as a result?to-the-closed-heart-pic

Maybe a church or an individual in a church, maybe even a priest or pastor, has let you down in a major way. If that is the case, I am sorry. Really. Too many people suffer from such things. Maybe the person who hurt you wasn’t in fact a Christian at all, many wear the name who do not sincerely swear allegiance to Christ. Others who are truly Christian still make mistakes as they grow and mature in their Christian walk. Please try to understand, that gives further evidence of the sin problem Christ dealt with. It is not a reason to reject him, but a reason to run to him.

If you read one of the gospel accounts (I might recommend Mark, a short, fast paced account of the life of Jesus), I bet you’ll be surprised by the frustration Jesus himself expressed for religious leaders and the people who claimed what they did not live. Yet crowds flocked to Jesus, those who honestly faced their sin and wanted a solution to it. When the Apostle Peter preached the first resurrection message (in Acts 2) people who were convicted cried out, “What must we do?” And Peter replied, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sins…” Many (3,000) responded.

That was just the beginning. Such can be the beginning for you too. Please open your heart back up and consider the true message of Jesus.