Hollywood Preaches

“I have always felt life first as a story – and if there is a story, there is a story teller.” G.K. Chesterton

Life doesn’t come to us as a math problem. It comes to us the way that a story comes, scene by scene. What will happen next?  You and I don’t get to know those specifics of our lives; we just enter in and take the journey as it comes.  We humans have lingering questions.  Who am I really?  Why am I here?  Where do I find the meaning of my life?  What does God want of me?  Sometimes it feels like a movie that we’ve arrived at 45 minutes late.  Interesting stuff, but I don’t get it!  To know the answers, we must engage with the story teller, we must see the bigger picture.

Science does not provide the answers we need. Far too many scientists (not all to be sure) say the answer to the question “How did it all begin?” is “An accident.”  To the question “How will it all end?” they repeat themselves, “Probably by another accident.”  And we sigh, thinking that doesn’t feel like a life worth living; knowing there must be a better answer than that.

Then we go to the movies and watch what on the surface appears to be a secular story, but it is interesting how it plays out. “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.”    In all such stories, we see a similar theme.  There is love, adventure, danger, a hero, an evil adversary, sacrifice is required, odds that seem insurmountable, and yet in the end the hero is victorious!  Ever notice how such themes are common in movies, yet depict a scenario so similar to the picture the Bible paints?  Wonder why that is?

Hollywood Preaches

The Sound of Music, Braveheart, Gladiator, Rocky, The Matrix, The Lord of the Rings, Spiderman, etc. On and on we could go with movies that tell the Bible story, they just don’t use the Bible characters.  A positive scene with peace, then something goes wrong, there is an evil person who wants to hurt the protagonists, things seem desperate, a battle is fought, and the hero must overcome many obstacles to win the day and restore peace.  Isn’t that the Bible story?  Hollywood preaches this over and over without even realizing the parallel.  All such stories have the same basic structure because these stories borrow from the Larger Story of life. Use this as a teaching tool with your kids as you watch movies.

Maybe we can learn from Hollywood how to better position ourselves for life’s story. Not religion as usual, just going to church on Sunday with proper manners. Religion is often man’s attempt to find God, but with Christianity we find God’s attempt to find man (you and me) through Christ.  That relationship and what it means defines our part in the story. Do we side with the evil one, or with the hero?  To wade into the muddy water in-between puts us in danger.  But we play a part in this story, to be sure. “Going to church” is a piece of it, we sure aren’t super heroes, so we need encouragement and resources.

And we finally realize that the only person who can properly define this story is the author himself. Wouldn’t it be something if he wrote it all down for us to read, to study, to learn from and work from?  “I wonder what sort of tale we’ve fallen into?” says Sam to Frodo in Lord of the Rings.  I wonder.

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…the Word became flesh and dwelt among us.” (John 1) A hero has arrived; read of him and learn the true story.

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Is Baptism Necessary?

I wish this wasn’t an issue. It shouldn’t be for Bible believing people. But when it comes to baptism, the various stances of churches and teachers over the years has made it an issue. So, the question becomes: In the process of understanding who Jesus is, that he died for my sins, rose from the dead, and thus conquered death on my behalf; deciding I will become a disciple of Jesus, must I be baptized?

The best source for resolving that issue is the book of Acts. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John tell us of the life of Jesus, describe his death and resurrection. The letters written by the apostles or their apprentice instruct Christians, admonish, provide encouragement. Only the book of Acts truly focuses on people becoming Christian, then forming churches. What do we find there on baptism? Let’s look.Is Baptism Necessary Pic

Acts 2 – Peter preaches on Pentecost, telling the crowd, “Repent and be baptized, every one of you.”

Acts 8 – We are told the Samaritans believed and they were baptized; then we see that when the Ethiopian Eunuch was told of Jesus he said, “Here is water, what prevents me from being baptized?”

Acts 9 – Saul/Paul is converted, and we see he arose and was baptized. When he retells the story in Acts 22 we find Ananias telling him, “And now why do you delay, rise and be baptized and wash your sins away, calling on the name of the Lord.”

Acts 10 – Cornelius, the first Gentile convert, Peter commands him to be baptized in the name of Jesus. Acts 16 – Lydia is converted, the Lord opened her heart to pay attention we’re told, then she was baptized. Same chapter we find the Jailer believes, and he was baptized. Acts 18 – Crispus, we are told, believed and was baptized.

Acts 19 – disciples of John the Baptist – knew of John’s baptism, but when the need based on the connection to Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection is explained, they are baptized in name of Jesus.

There are a couple of other accounts in Acts of people “believing” with no mention of baptism, but to the Jew of the 1st Century, believing without following through with the necessary action was nonsense. To truly believe, you followed through. We can easily assume they did so.

Join the above examples from Acts with the strait-forward instruction of Jesus and his apostles and it is pretty compelling. Jesus said, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” (Matt. 28:19). The Apostle Paul provides the explanation for what baptism accomplishes, “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried with him by baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life.” (Romans 6:3, 4) We also find that through baptism we are clothed with Christ, hiding our sins while allowing God to see us through the righteousness of Jesus (Galatians 3: 26, 27).

There’s nothing magical about being dunked in water in itself, but when predicated by genuine faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, it is a step of that faith we must not neglect.

…having been buried with him (Jesus) in baptism in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead. (Colossians 2:11,12)